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The Magnificent Horsehead Nebula. Sculpted by stellar winds and radiation, a magnificent interstellar dust cloud by chance has assumed this recognizable shape. Fittingly named the Horsehead Nebula, it is some 1,500 light-years distant, embedded in the vast Orion cloud complex. About five light-years "tall", the dark cloud is cataloged as Barnard 33 and is visible only because its obscuring dust is silhouetted against the glowing red emission nebula IC 434.

The Magnificent Horsehead Nebula. Sculpted by stellar winds and radiation, a magnificent interstellar dust cloud by chance has assumed this recognizable shape. Fittingly named the Horsehead Nebula, it is some 1,500 light-years distant, embedded in the vast Orion cloud complex. About five light-years "tall", the dark cloud is cataloged as Barnard 33 and is visible only because its obscuring dust is silhouetted against the glowing red emission nebula IC 434.

Zeta Oph: Runaway Star http://ift.tt/2o81Q3n April 07 2017 at 09:27PM  Zeta Oph: Runaway Star http://ift.tt/2o7Ki7D April 08 2017 Like a ship plowing through cosmic seas runaway star Zeta Ophiuchi produces the arcing interstellar bow wave or bow shock seen in this stunning infrared portrait. In the false-color view bluish Zeta Oph a star about 20 times more massive than the Sun lies near the center of the frame moving toward the left at 24 kilometers per second. Its strong stellar wind…

Zeta Oph: Runaway Star http://ift.tt/2o81Q3n April 07 2017 at 09:27PM Zeta Oph: Runaway Star http://ift.tt/2o7Ki7D April 08 2017 Like a ship plowing through cosmic seas runaway star Zeta Ophiuchi produces the arcing interstellar bow wave or bow shock seen in this stunning infrared portrait. In the false-color view bluish Zeta Oph a star about 20 times more massive than the Sun lies near the center of the frame moving toward the left at 24 kilometers per second. Its strong stellar wind…

The picture was taken by Astronaut Scott Kelly on August 9, 2015, the 135th day of his one-year mission in space on the International Space Station. The Milky Way stretches the curve of Earth in the scene that also records a faint red, extended airglow. The galaxy's central bulge appears with starfields cut by dark rifts of obscuring interstellar dust. Since November 2000, people have been living continuously on the International Space Station.

The picture was taken by Astronaut Scott Kelly on August 9, 2015, the 135th day of his one-year mission in space on the International Space Station. The Milky Way stretches the curve of Earth in the scene that also records a faint red, extended airglow. The galaxy's central bulge appears with starfields cut by dark rifts of obscuring interstellar dust. Since November 2000, people have been living continuously on the International Space Station.

East of Antares, dark markings sprawl through crowded star fields toward the center of our Milky Way Galaxy. Cataloged in the early 20th century by astronomer E. E. Barnard, the obscuring interstellar dust clouds include B59, B72, B77 and B78, seen in silhouette against the starry background. Here, their combined shape suggests a pipe stem and bowl, and so the dark nebula's popular name is the Pipe Nebula.

East of Antares, dark markings sprawl through crowded star fields toward the center of our Milky Way Galaxy. Cataloged in the early 20th century by astronomer E. E. Barnard, the obscuring interstellar dust clouds include B59, B72, B77 and B78, seen in silhouette against the starry background. Here, their combined shape suggests a pipe stem and bowl, and so the dark nebula's popular name is the Pipe Nebula.

Narrow band filters and a false-color palette give these three nebulae a stunning appearance against the cosmic canvas of the central Milky Way. All three are stellar nurseries about 5,000 light-years or so distant, toward the nebula rich constellation Sagittarius. In the 18th century, astronomer Charles Messier cataloged two of them; colorful M8, above and right of center, and compact M20 at the left. The third, NGC 6559, is at bottom right.

Narrow band filters and a false-color palette give these three nebulae a stunning appearance against the cosmic canvas of the central Milky Way. All three are stellar nurseries about 5,000 light-years or so distant, toward the nebula rich constellation Sagittarius. In the 18th century, astronomer Charles Messier cataloged two of them; colorful M8, above and right of center, and compact M20 at the left. The third, NGC 6559, is at bottom right.

A Fox Fur, a Unicorn, and a Christmas Tree – Image by Rolf Geissinger. More from NASA: “What do the following things have in common: a cone, the fur of a fox, and a Christmas tree? Answer: they all occur in the constellation of the unicorn (Monoceros). Pictured as a star forming region cataloged as NGC 2264, the complex jumble of cosmic gas and dust is about 2,700 light-years distant and mixes reddish emission nebulae excited by energetic light from newborn stars with dark interstellar dust…

A Fox Fur, a Unicorn, and a Christmas Tree – Image by Rolf Geissinger. More from NASA: “What do the following things have in common: a cone, the fur of a fox, and a Christmas tree? Answer: they all occur in the constellation of the unicorn (Monoceros). Pictured as a star forming region cataloged as NGC 2264, the complex jumble of cosmic gas and dust is about 2,700 light-years distant and mixes reddish emission nebulae excited by energetic light from newborn stars with dark interstellar dust…

Image Credit: NASA/ESA A new image from the Hubble Space Telescope takes a look at Messier 22: the closest, brightest and most spectacular globular cluster in our local part of the Milky Way Galaxy; It can be found approximately 11,000 light-years away from Earth in the constellation of Sagittarius. Otherwise known as NGC 6656, Messier 22 spans around 70 light-years across, and boasts a combined mass of 500,000 Suns. Given its size, and close proximity, it’s easily the most prominent…

Image Credit: NASA/ESA A new image from the Hubble Space Telescope takes a look at Messier 22: the closest, brightest and most spectacular globular cluster in our local part of the Milky Way Galaxy; It can be found approximately 11,000 light-years away from Earth in the constellation of Sagittarius. Otherwise known as NGC 6656, Messier 22 spans around 70 light-years across, and boasts a combined mass of 500,000 Suns. Given its size, and close proximity, it’s easily the most prominent…

Lynds' Dark Nebula 673, a haunting nebula located some 400 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Aquila. The nebula itself is situated in the center of the Aquila Rift, which comprises a dark molecular cloud - containing several dark nebulae. This particular region is home to enough material to spawn thousands of baby stars. But since the region is dense in obscuring interstellar dust grains, the number of stars that are already in the process of forming remains unknown.

Lynds' Dark Nebula 673, a haunting nebula located some 400 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Aquila. The nebula itself is situated in the center of the Aquila Rift, which comprises a dark molecular cloud - containing several dark nebulae. This particular region is home to enough material to spawn thousands of baby stars. But since the region is dense in obscuring interstellar dust grains, the number of stars that are already in the process of forming remains unknown.

Pictured above as a star forming region cataloged as NGC 2264, the complex jumble of cosmic gas and dust is about 2,700 light-years distant and mixes reddish emission nebulae excited by energetic light from newborn stars with dark interstellar dust clouds. Where the otherwise obscuring dust clouds lie close to the hot, young stars they also reflect starlight, forming blue reflection nebulae. Image Credit: Rolf Geissinger, NASA

Pictured above as a star forming region cataloged as NGC 2264, the complex jumble of cosmic gas and dust is about 2,700 light-years distant and mixes reddish emission nebulae excited by energetic light from newborn stars with dark interstellar dust clouds. Where the otherwise obscuring dust clouds lie close to the hot, young stars they also reflect starlight, forming blue reflection nebulae. Image Credit: Rolf Geissinger, NASA

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