The bio-light uses different biological technologies to create ambient light effects. The concept explores the use of bioluminescent bacteria, which are fed with methane and composted material (drawn from the methane digester in the Microbial Home system). Alternatively the cellular light array can be filled with fluorescent proteins that emit different frequencies of light.

The bio-light uses different biological technologies to create ambient light effects. The concept explores the use of bioluminescent bacteria, which are fed with methane and composted material (drawn from the methane digester in the Microbial Home system). Alternatively the cellular light array can be filled with fluorescent proteins that emit different frequencies of light.

philips eco-friendly microbial home methane bio-digester the 'bio-digester' is a kitchen island that includes a chopping surface with waste grinder and gas cooking range. in the device, 'bio-gas' is produced by developing gas-generating bacteria cultures that live off of organic waste. the bacterias' gas is collected and burnt, for use in the built-in cooking range and lights or sent through to heat water pipes and be used in other components of the 'microbial home'.

philips eco-friendly microbial home methane bio-digester the 'bio-digester' is a kitchen island that includes a chopping surface with waste grinder and gas cooking range. in the device, 'bio-gas' is produced by developing gas-generating bacteria cultures that live off of organic waste. the bacterias' gas is collected and burnt, for use in the built-in cooking range and lights or sent through to heat water pipes and be used in other components of the 'microbial home'.

The glass elements on this island are used to show energy reserves and the readiness of the compost sludge. The bio-digester needs a constant supply of water and waste material to function properly, so it’s important that these indicators are visible.

The Swiss designer Beat Karrer researches new processing methods of bio-degradable plastics... organic plastics are so-called biopolymers – molecule chains of greater or lesser length which are formed from living organisms, in other words of vegetable (starch, cellulose, pectin), bacterial (polylactic acid) or animal origin (gelatine, wool, silk etc.). They can be supplemented by reinforcing materials such as natural fibre or filling matter.

High-Tech meets eco

The Swiss designer Beat Karrer researches new processing methods of bio-degradable plastics... organic plastics are so-called biopolymers – molecule chains of greater or lesser length which are formed from living organisms, in other words of vegetable (starch, cellulose, pectin), bacterial (polylactic acid) or animal origin (gelatine, wool, silk etc.). They can be supplemented by reinforcing materials such as natural fibre or filling matter.

'bio-denim jacket' by Suzanne Lee. Textile made from bacterial cellulose grown in a solution of sweetened tea

'bio-denim jacket' by Suzanne Lee. Textile made from bacterial cellulose grown in a solution of sweetened tea

#Bacterial #cellulose, like that produced by this genetically modified bacteria, is an extremely pure substance that is also biocompatible and very strong. The uses for it as a material are really endless. It can be used in he creation of human tissue scaffolds, which can then be utilized in the harvesting of human organs, as well as the regeneration of diseased organs...

#Bacterial #cellulose, like that produced by this genetically modified bacteria, is an extremely pure substance that is also biocompatible and very strong. The uses for it as a material are really endless. It can be used in he creation of human tissue scaffolds, which can then be utilized in the harvesting of human organs, as well as the regeneration of diseased organs...

Suzanne Lee, BioCouture - " The bodice was constructed by applying a pattern of dried beans to a wooden body form and allowing the wet cellulose material to dry down onto it. It took about a week before it could be lifted off. I then sewed in a conventional zip fastening (as yet there is no biodegradable alternative)."

Suzanne Lee, BioCouture - " The bodice was constructed by applying a pattern of dried beans to a wooden body form and allowing the wet cellulose material to dry down onto it. It took about a week before it could be lifted off. I then sewed in a conventional zip fastening (as yet there is no biodegradable alternative)."

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