Meroë: Africa's Forgotten Empire

120 kilometres north of Khartoum lie the ruins of ancient Meroë. One of the earliest cities in Africa outside Egypt, for almost a thousand years (c.700BC-AD330) Meroë was an important religious and administrative centre in the Kingdom of Kush. Today, Meroë is recognised academically as among the most important sites in the history of ancient Sudan, but is all-but-unknown to the general public. Overshadowed by its northern neighbour, Egypt, Meroë remains Africa's forgotten empire.
93 Pins16 Followers
Detail from JG-M-J-022 (1912) – Three workmen carry debris from the site during the excavations of Meroë.

Detail from JG-M-J-022 (1912) – Three workmen carry debris from the site during the excavations of Meroë.

JG-M-J-022 (1912) – Workmen excavating on-site at Meroë.

JG-M-J-022 (1912) – Workmen excavating on-site at Meroë.

JG-M-A-044 (1912) – Workmen carrying an A-frame, while constructing the aerial railway during the excavations of Meroë.

JG-M-A-044 (1912) – Workmen carrying an A-frame, while constructing the aerial railway during the excavations of Meroë.

JG-M-ZZ-015 (1913) – Women playing golf at Meroë.

JG-M-ZZ-015 (1913) – Women playing golf at Meroë.

JG-M-B-010 (1910) – Close up on Garstang and a boy, looking out over the Isis Temple at site 600 at Meroë.

JG-M-B-010 (1910) – Close up on Garstang and a boy, looking out over the Isis Temple at site 600 at Meroë.

JG-M-B-010 (1910) – The scale of the site proved a significant challenge for Garstang during excavation. Here, Garstang and a boy can be seen in the foreground, looking out over the Isis Temple at site 600 at Meroë.

JG-M-B-010 (1910) – The scale of the site proved a significant challenge for Garstang during excavation. Here, Garstang and a boy can be seen in the foreground, looking out over the Isis Temple at site 600 at Meroë.

JG-M-AA-054 (1912) - The excavations at Meroë revealed a large number of monumental buildings at the site, most of which were identified as temples or palaces. Here, a small columned enclosure, built as part of one of the temples at Meroë, is seen. Garstang referred to this as the “prostyle temple”. A workman holds the site number for the building.

JG-M-AA-054 (1912) - The excavations at Meroë revealed a large number of monumental buildings at the site, most of which were identified as temples or palaces. Here, a small columned enclosure, built as part of one of the temples at Meroë, is seen. Garstang referred to this as the “prostyle temple”. A workman holds the site number for the building.

JG-M-A-037 (1911) – A local woman holds a large pot on her shoulder, in the village of Begrewiyeh, near Meroë.

JG-M-A-037 (1911) – A local woman holds a large pot on her shoulder, in the village of Begrewiyeh, near Meroë.

JG-M-A-036 (1912) – Two women and a boy sitting in front of a Tukul house in the village of Begrewiyeh, near Meroë. The boy and one of the women hold a goat each.

JG-M-A-036 (1912) – Two women and a boy sitting in front of a Tukul house in the village of Begrewiyeh, near Meroë. The boy and one of the women hold a goat each.

JG-M-A-035 (1912) – Although the ancient city of Meroë was sacked and abandoned in the fourth century AD, at the time of Garstang’s excavation the area was still sparsely populated, with the village of Begrewiyeh located nearby. Two adults and a boy holding a goat, sat in front of a Tukul house. The ‘Tukul’ is a kind of round house with a pointed roof, found throughout East Africa.

JG-M-A-035 (1912) – Although the ancient city of Meroë was sacked and abandoned in the fourth century AD, at the time of Garstang’s excavation the area was still sparsely populated, with the village of Begrewiyeh located nearby. Two adults and a boy holding a goat, sat in front of a Tukul house. The ‘Tukul’ is a kind of round house with a pointed roof, found throughout East Africa.

Pinterest • The world’s catalogue of ideas
Search