Modern Aramaic (Assyrian/Syriac)/ English-Modern Aramaic: Dictionary and Phrasebook by Nicholas Awde, Nineb Limassu, and Nicholas Al-Jeloo

Modern Aramaic (Assyrian/Syriac)/ English-Modern Aramaic: Dictionary and Phrasebook by Nicholas Awde, Nineb Limassu, and Nicholas Al-Jeloo

pin 20
heart 12
The Syriac alphabet developed from the Aramaic alphabet and was used mainly to write the Syriac language from about the 2nd century BC. There are a number of different forms of the Syriac alphabet: Esṭrangelā (ܐܣܛܪܢܓܠܐ), Serṭā (ܣܪܛܐ) and Madnḥāyā (ܡܕܢܚܝܐ). (...)

The Syriac alphabet developed from the Aramaic alphabet and was used mainly to write the Syriac language from about the 2nd century BC. There are a number of different forms of the Syriac alphabet: Esṭrangelā (ܐܣܛܪܢܓܠܐ), Serṭā (ܣܪܛܐ) and Madnḥāyā (ܡܕܢܚܝܐ). (...)

pin 2
Syriac language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Syriac language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

heart 1
Syriac language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Syriac language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

pin 2
ARAMAIC  The Aramaic language was the international trade language of the ancient Middle East between 1000 and 600 BCE, spoken from the Mediterranean coast to the borders of India. Its script, derived from Phoenician and first attested during the 9th century BCE, also became extremely popular and was adopted by many people with or without any previous writing system

ARAMAIC The Aramaic language was the international trade language of the ancient Middle East between 1000 and 600 BCE, spoken from the Mediterranean coast to the borders of India. Its script, derived from Phoenician and first attested during the 9th century BCE, also became extremely popular and was adopted by many people with or without any previous writing system

pin 11
Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in Assyrian Neo-Aramaic

Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in Assyrian Neo-Aramaic

Along with Latin and Greek, Syriac became one of "the three most important Christian languages in the early centuries" of the Christian Era.[9] From the 1st century AD Syriac became the vehicle of Syriac Christianity and culture, and the liturgical language of the Syriac Orthodox Church and subsequently the Church of the East, along with its descendants: the Chaldean Catholic Church, the Assyrian Church of the East, the Ancient Church of the East, the Saint Thomas Christian Churches,[10] and…

Along with Latin and Greek, Syriac became one of "the three most important Christian languages in the early centuries" of the Christian Era.[9] From the 1st century AD Syriac became the vehicle of Syriac Christianity and culture, and the liturgical language of the Syriac Orthodox Church and subsequently the Church of the East, along with its descendants: the Chaldean Catholic Church, the Assyrian Church of the East, the Ancient Church of the East, the Saint Thomas Christian Churches,[10] and…

heart 1
Syriac began as an unwritten spoken dialect of Old Aramaic in northern Mesopotamia. Syriac is a dialect of Middle Aramaic that was once spoken across much of the Fertile Crescent. Having first appeared as a script in the 1st century AD after being spoken as an unwritten language for five centuries, Classical Syriac became a major literary language throughout the Middle East from the 4th to the 8th centuries, the classical language of Edessa, preserved in a large body of Syriac literature.

Syriac began as an unwritten spoken dialect of Old Aramaic in northern Mesopotamia. Syriac is a dialect of Middle Aramaic that was once spoken across much of the Fertile Crescent. Having first appeared as a script in the 1st century AD after being spoken as an unwritten language for five centuries, Classical Syriac became a major literary language throughout the Middle East from the 4th to the 8th centuries, the classical language of Edessa, preserved in a large body of Syriac literature.

pin 4
Rare antique Bible manuscript written in Syriac, a dialect of the native language of Jesus - thought to be 2,000 years old

Rare antique Bible manuscript written in Syriac, a dialect of the native language of Jesus - thought to be 2,000 years old

pin 25
heart 4
Pinterest • The world’s catalogue of ideas
Search