Mr. P.'s current complaint is dyspnea, a sudden onset of a swollen neck, and a new diagnosis of small cell lung cancer. Because his symptoms are suggestive of superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS), which is potentially life threatening, he was immediately admitted to the hospital. A CT scan identified the source of the SVCS to be his malignancy.

Mr. P.'s current complaint is dyspnea, a sudden onset of a swollen neck, and a new diagnosis of small cell lung cancer. Because his symptoms are suggestive of superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS), which is potentially life threatening, he was immediately admitted to the hospital. A CT scan identified the source of the SVCS to be his malignancy.

Superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS), or superior vena cava obstruction (SVCO), is usually the result of the direct obstruction of the superior vena cava by malignancies such as compression of the vessel wall by right upper lobe tumors or thymoma and/or mediastinal lymphadenopathy. The most common malignancy that causes SVCS is bronchogenic carcinoma

Superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS), or superior vena cava obstruction (SVCO), is usually the result of the direct obstruction of the superior vena cava by malignancies such as compression of the vessel wall by right upper lobe tumors or thymoma and/or mediastinal lymphadenopathy. The most common malignancy that causes SVCS is bronchogenic carcinoma

Superior Vena Cava Syndrome occurs when the SVC is compressed or obstructed by tumor growth. Signs and symptoms result from blockage of blood flow in the venous system of the head, neck, and upper trunk. Early s/s which generally occur in the morning, include edema of the face, especially around the eyes, and tightness of shirt collars. As condition worsens, the client experiences edema of the arms and hands, dyspnea, erythema of the upper body, and epistaxis.

Superior Vena Cava Syndrome occurs when the SVC is compressed or obstructed by tumor growth. Signs and symptoms result from blockage of blood flow in the venous system of the head, neck, and upper trunk. Early s/s which generally occur in the morning, include edema of the face, especially around the eyes, and tightness of shirt collars. As condition worsens, the client experiences edema of the arms and hands, dyspnea, erythema of the upper body, and epistaxis.

The most common causes of superior vena cava syndrome are extrinsic compression of the superior vena cava and intraluminal venous thrombosis

The most common causes of superior vena cava syndrome are extrinsic compression of the superior vena cava and intraluminal venous thrombosis

Superior Vena Cava Syndrome – Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Ongoing care - Partial or complete obstruction of the superior vena cava (SVC): 90% extrinsic 90% from neoplasm (most frequently lung cancer)   Read more: http://health.tipsdiscover.com/superior-vena-cava-syndrome-causes-symptoms-diagnosis-treatment-ongoing-care/#ixzz2lvo94Rdg

Superior Vena Cava Syndrome – Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Ongoing care - Partial or complete obstruction of the superior vena cava (SVC): 90% extrinsic 90% from neoplasm (most frequently lung cancer) Read more: http://health.tipsdiscover.com/superior-vena-cava-syndrome-causes-symptoms-diagnosis-treatment-ongoing-care/#ixzz2lvo94Rdg

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