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from yourgenome

How do you identify the genes in a genome?

Here is a beautifully clear illustration of the basic structure of a gene showing the promoter, start codon, introns, exons and stop codon.

from yourgenome

What happens to DNA sequence when it comes off a sequencing machine?

Making sense of DNA data! This simple diagram shows the flow from DNA sequencing to comparing data. Step 2: Quality control (1/4)

from yourgenome

How do you find out the significance of a genome after sequencing?

Making sense of DNA data! This simple diagram shows the flow from DNA sequencing to comparing data. Step 5: Comparison (4/4)

The Caracal -- Genetically linked to the Serval Cat in size and body shape. This is not a Lynx; about 80% of the Pinners that pin this cat, misidentify it as a Lynx. The body structure of the Lynx is stockier; although both species have the trademark tuft on the tip of their ears --- that is all. If you look at the Serval Cat, you'll immediately see the two are genetically related--and will stop misidentifying it.

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from yourgenome

How do you identify the genes in a genome?

Making sense of DNA data! This simple diagram shows the flow from DNA sequencing to comparing data. Step 4: Annotation (3/4)

from yourgenome

How do you put a genome back together after sequencing?

Making sense of DNA data! This simple diagram shows the flow from DNA sequencing to comparing data. Step 3: Assembly (2/4)

from BBC News

DNA sequencing of MRSA used to stop outbreak

An outbreak of the hospital superbug MRSA has been brought to an end by UK doctors cracking the bacterium's genetic code.

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▶ Protein Synthesis Animation Video - 2:25 tRNA is joined to the mRNA by a peptide bond. A tRNA moved into the Asite where the codons match the mRNA the Ribosome shifts down by one codon at a time and new amino acids are added one at a time. It cuts off when a stop codon moves into the A site on the mRNA. The mRNA & the amino acid/protein are both released by the ribosome. p-site, A (acceptor) site & E site =Exit

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TJ. In molecular biology and genetics, translation is the process in which cellular ribosomes create proteins. In translation, messenger RNA (mRNA)—produced by transcription from DNA—is decoded by a ribosome to produce a specific amino acid chain, or polypeptide. The polypeptide later folds into an active protein and performs its functions in the cell. The ribosome facilitates decoding by inducing the binding of complementary tRNA anticodon sequences to mRNA codons. The tRNAs carry…