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WWI. British troops advance in the Battle of the Somme, 1916. Nota: con riserva di dubbi a proposito di un'istantanea di questa qualità, negli anni della Prima Guerra Mondiale.

WWI. British troops advance in the Battle of the Somme, 1916. Nota: con riserva di dubbi a proposito di un'istantanea di questa qualità, negli anni della Prima Guerra Mondiale.

The Lochnagar Crater in Somme, France is a privately owned crater made during World War I. It was purchased by Richard Dunning in 1978 with the aim of preserving the site.

The Lochnagar Crater in Somme, France is a privately owned crater made during World War I. It was purchased by Richard Dunning in 1978 with the aim of preserving the site.

Gas, mud and horror: How German and Allied forces fought during the First World War

Gas, mud and horror: How German and Allied forces fought during the First World War

Colonel Philip R Robertson, commanding officer of the 1st Battalion, Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) returning from a tour of his unit's positions in waterlogged trenches at Bois Grenier in January 1915.

Colonel Philip R Robertson, commanding officer of the 1st Battalion, Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) returning from a tour of his unit's positions in waterlogged trenches at Bois Grenier in January 1915.

©IWM (Q 4499) WWI,13 Nov 1916, Somme, Battle of the Ancre. A Military Policeman with a wounded German prisoner captured at St Pierre Divion. (Detail)

©IWM (Q 4499) WWI,13 Nov 1916, Somme, Battle of the Ancre. A Military Policeman with a wounded German prisoner captured at St Pierre Divion. (Detail)

Field Marshall Douglas Haig rides a horse at an unknown location in France, Feb. 14, 1916. Haig was the British commander-in-chief during the Somme battle.

Never Before Published World War One Photographs Revealed

Field Marshall Douglas Haig rides a horse at an unknown location in France, Feb. 14, 1916. Haig was the British commander-in-chief during the Somme battle.

Doomed? One of the most iconic images of the war shows soldiers of the Royal Irish Rifles waiting to join the offensive on the Somme on 1 July, 1916. There were 60,000 British casualties that day - almost 20,000 died. The battle continued until mid-November, but  no other day produced  such appalling losses

Dramatic photographs from WW1 that show the carnage... and courage

Doomed? One of the most iconic images of the war shows soldiers of the Royal Irish Rifles waiting to join the offensive on the Somme on 1 July, 1916. There were 60,000 British casualties that day - almost 20,000 died. The battle continued until mid-November, but no other day produced such appalling losses

WWI. ‘Sammy’, the mascot of the Northumberland Fusiliers, was gassed during the Second Battle of Ypres which began on 22 April 1915.

WWI. ‘Sammy’, the mascot of the Northumberland Fusiliers, was gassed during the Second Battle of Ypres which began on 22 April 1915.

Remembering The Battle Of The Somme – 100 Years On #Infographic #History #War

Remembering The Battle Of The Somme – 100 Years On #Infographic

Remembering The Battle Of The Somme – 100 Years On #Infographic #History #War

July 1, 1916. The First Day of the Battle of the Somme. Despite the heavy loss of life and failure to achieve the expected breakthrough, Field Marshal Haig and General Rawlinson deemed the attack a success, so much that the offensive was to continue for a further four months, only ending with the onset of winter. - prisonersofeternity.co.uk

July 1, 1916. The First Day of the Battle of the Somme. Despite the heavy loss of life and failure to achieve the expected breakthrough, Field Marshal Haig and General Rawlinson deemed the attack a success, so much that the offensive was to continue for a further four months, only ending with the onset of winter. - prisonersofeternity.co.uk

Compared with what was to follow, the weeks leading up to the bloodiest battle in British history were a gentle calm before the storm, as these astonishing 100-year-old photographs show.

Heartbreaking photos of troops on the eve of the Somme 100 years ago

Compared with what was to follow, the weeks leading up to the bloodiest battle in British history were a gentle calm before the storm, as these astonishing 100-year-old photographs show.

An archive picture shows Field Marshall Douglas Haig riding a horse at an unknown location in France February 14, 1916. Haig was the British commander-in-chief during the Somme battle.

An archive picture shows Field Marshall Douglas Haig riding a horse at an unknown location in France February 14, 1916. Haig was the British commander-in-chief during the Somme battle.

When people think of World War I, one of the first images that comes to mind is the trench.  Here’s a look into how these major features were constructed, as well as their impact on the war. …

Trench construction in World War I

When people think of World War I, one of the first images that comes to mind is the trench. Here’s a look into how these major features were constructed, as well as their impact on the war. …

The Third Battle of Ypres (Passchendaele) 31 July-10 November 1917 A knocked out British tank half submerged in mud and water near St Julien, 12 October 1917.| First World War Poetry Digital Archive

The Third Battle of Ypres (Passchendaele) 31 July-10 November 1917 A knocked out British tank half submerged in mud and water near St Julien, 12 October 1917.| First World War Poetry Digital Archive

For much of the First World War, the small French village of Vignacourt was always behind the front lines ¿ as a staging point, casualty clearing station and recreation area for troops of all nationalities moving up to and then back from the battlefields on the Somme.

Photos show faces of First World War soldiers on the eve of battle

For much of the First World War, the small French village of Vignacourt was always behind the front lines ¿ as a staging point, casualty clearing station and recreation area for troops of all nationalities moving up to and then back from the battlefields on the Somme.