Pinterest • The world’s catalogue of ideas

Insouciant - free from concern, worry, or anxiety. Origin Insouciant entered English from French, based on the French verb soucier meaning "to worry." Ultimately it finds its roots in the Latin sollicitāre meaning "to disturb."

52
8

//nO-va-'tUr-E-ent// Although this word has not yet been listed in Merriam-Webster and Oxford English Dictionary but it has been used by many writers to describe someone/ something that desires change or alterations. This word has its Latin roots from the words nova which means new and turire which means the desire to/for. Literally meaning the desire for something new. <a href="/ravivora/" title="Ravi Vora">@Ravi Vora</a>

//nO-va-'tUr-E-ent// Although this word has not yet been listed in Merriam-Webster and Oxford English Dictionary but it has been used by many writers to describe someone/ something that desires change or alterations. This word has its Latin roots from the words nova which means new and turire which means the desire to/for. Literally meaning the desire for something new. @ravivora

27
4
1
from BuzzFeed

23 Perfect Words For Emotions You Never Realised Anyone Else Felt

The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows is a compendium of invented words written by John Koenig. Each original definition aims to fill a hole in the language—to give a name to emotions we all might...

2

tutelary (adjective): Serving as a protector, guardian, or patron. Word of the Day for 17 May 2015. #WOTD #WordoftheDay #tutelary

30
6