Old english language

Old English FEER-ye-brak // fyrgevraec - the distinct, sharp, crackling or breaking sound made by fire

Old English FEER-ye-brak // fyrgevraec - the distinct, sharp, crackling or breaking sound made by fire

Comparison of Old English and modern English, with the introduction of Beowulf. The full site is an encyclopedia of languages with information on history of languages, etc.

Comparison of Old English and modern English, with the introduction of Beowulf. The full site is an encyclopedia of languages with information on history of languages, etc.

Quote: When discussing her Project, April liked to dwell on the eldritch twentieth-century correlation between women's hemlines and the stock market. Bruce Sterling, Heavy Weather, 1994 Origin: Eldritch is of uncertain origin, but the earlier elrich is equivalent to the Old English el- meaning "foreign, strange, uncanny" and rīce meaning "kingdom"; hence “of a strange country, pertaining to the Otherworld.”

Quote: When discussing her Project, April liked to dwell on the eldritch twentieth-century correlation between women's hemlines and the stock market. Bruce Sterling, Heavy Weather, 1994 Origin: Eldritch is of uncertain origin, but the earlier elrich is equivalent to the Old English el- meaning "foreign, strange, uncanny" and rīce meaning "kingdom"; hence “of a strange country, pertaining to the Otherworld.”

I receive weekly reminders of my linguistic ignorance whenever I read anything by authors fluent in Latin.

I receive weekly reminders of my linguistic ignorance whenever I read anything by authors fluent in Latin.

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