May day history

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Feast of Beltane  Long ago, Celts celebrated Beltane, which was a calendar feast that welcomed summer. Bonfires figured largely into this celebration, and some activities included dancing around the fire, burning effigies of witches(?), and herding cattle in between bonfires. Fire was seen as a purifying source. In recent years, neopagans have begun to celebrate Beltane once more.

Feast of Beltane Long ago, Celts celebrated Beltane, which was a calendar feast that welcomed summer. Bonfires figured largely into this celebration, and some activities included dancing around the fire, burning effigies of witches(?), and herding cattle in between bonfires. Fire was seen as a purifying source. In recent years, neopagans have begun to celebrate Beltane once more.

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May Day is related to the Celtic festival of Beltane and the Germanic festival of Walpurgis Night.  – it has traditionally been an occasion for celebration. As Europe became Christianized, the pagan holidays lost their religious character and either changed into popular secular celebrations, as with May Day, or were merged with or replaced by new Christian holidays. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/May_Day

May Day is related to the Celtic festival of Beltane and the Germanic festival of Walpurgis Night. – it has traditionally been an occasion for celebration. As Europe became Christianized, the pagan holidays lost their religious character and either changed into popular secular celebrations, as with May Day, or were merged with or replaced by new Christian holidays. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/May_Day

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Anne Boleyn ( /ˈbʊlɪn/, /bəˈlɪn/ or /bʊˈlɪn/);[3][4] c.1501[5] – 19 May 1536) was Queen of England from 1533 to 1536 as the second wife of Henry VIII of England and Marquess of Pembroke in her own right.[6] Henry's marriage to Anne, and her subsequent execution, made her a key figure in the political and religious upheaval that was the start of the English Reformation.

Anne Boleyn ( /ˈbʊlɪn/, /bəˈlɪn/ or /bʊˈlɪn/);[3][4] c.1501[5] – 19 May 1536) was Queen of England from 1533 to 1536 as the second wife of Henry VIII of England and Marquess of Pembroke in her own right.[6] Henry's marriage to Anne, and her subsequent execution, made her a key figure in the political and religious upheaval that was the start of the English Reformation.

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The British GENES blog: Proposals on access to post-WW1 military service personnel records
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Mill wall, East London ~ The association with Cockney and the East End in the public imagination may be due to many people assuming that Bow Bells are to be found in the district of Bow, rather than the lesser known St Mary-le-Bow church. Thus while all East Enders are Cockneys, not all Cockneys are East Enders.

Mill wall, East London ~ The association with Cockney and the East End in the public imagination may be due to many people assuming that Bow Bells are to be found in the district of Bow, rather than the lesser known St Mary-le-Bow church. Thus while all East Enders are Cockneys, not all Cockneys are East Enders.

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Growing up I have many happy memories of May Day celebrations in school.~Daily Dish with Foodie Friends Friday

Growing up I have many happy memories of May Day celebrations in school.~Daily Dish with Foodie Friends Friday

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England's 20 worst learner drivers have attempted the practical test more than 700 times between them, it emerges.

England's 20 worst learner drivers have attempted the practical test more than 700 times between them, it emerges.

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Red Lion Street area, Kirk's Yard, Nottingham, 1919.  All demolished in the late 1920's-early 30's and replaced by some of the first purpose built council houses. Narrow Marsh lay beneath the cliff of the Lace Market, seen here in the background. The area was notorious for slum dwellings and outbreaks of cholera and other diseases. The houses on the left show frame-knitters windows. The timber-frame house, 'Marsh Farm' may be Tudor, with a marvellous display of repairs and patching.

Red Lion Street area, Kirk's Yard, Nottingham, 1919. All demolished in the late 1920's-early 30's and replaced by some of the first purpose built council houses. Narrow Marsh lay beneath the cliff of the Lace Market, seen here in the background. The area was notorious for slum dwellings and outbreaks of cholera and other diseases. The houses on the left show frame-knitters windows. The timber-frame house, 'Marsh Farm' may be Tudor, with a marvellous display of repairs and patching.

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