Pinterest • The world’s catalogue of images

Infographic on shark finning and the importance of sharks in marine ecosystems - Pew Environment Group

34
4

King Eider (Somateria spectabilis) is a large sea duck that breeds along Northern Hemisphere Arctic coasts of northeast Europe, North America and Asia. The birds spend most of the year in coastal marine ecosystems at high latitudes, and migrate to Arctic tundra to breed in June and July. They lay four to seven eggs in a scrape on the ground lined with grass and down.

25
1
from National Geographic

Jellyfish Photos

Jelly-Riding Crab Photograph by Hannah Johnson, My Shot A crab clings to its floating host as both are swept out to sea near Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. One role jellyfish play in the marine ecosystem is the transport of other animals across the ocean.

34
4

Climate Change. The animals (including marine animals) know it's happening but humans have their heads in the sand!

104
17

just look at the world around you right here on the ocean floor, such wonderful things surround you! What more are you looking for? Under the sea...

759
58

Sadly, overfishing is no joke. http://www.greenpeace.org/international/en/campaigns/oceans/overfishing/

9
1

The King Eider is a large sea duck that breeds along Northern Hemisphere Arctic coasts of NE Europe, North America & Asia. They spend most of the year in coastal marine ecosystems at high latitudes, and migrate to Arctic tundra to breed in June & July. They lay four to seven eggs in a scrape on the ground lined with grass and down.

10
2

This is one of three graphics that explain what happens if humans continue to push sharks toward extinction. Annihilating an apex predator will have major downstream consequences to marine ecosystems. Click to see the others.

9
from kcedventures.com

Layers of the Ocean: Under the Sea Science Activities

Learn about ocean layers with this creative science craft kids & teens will love!

156
22

"Sunlight coming in from the Academy's central square cast beautiful rays on the massive viewing pane of the Philippine Coral Reef. Solar energy powers the whole reef ecosystem. Algae is eaten by small invertebrates and herbivorous fish which are then eaten by carnivorous which expel nutrients which is then used up by the algae again. It's the circle of reef life!" By NMB.Photography

1