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US Army Private First Class Lynndie England one of the guards involved in the 2004 Abu Ghraib abuse scandal says she does not regret her actions. The revelation comes in the wake of the massacre of 16 Afghan civilians by a US soldier, further tarnishing the image of the American military.

from Mail Online

Why the hell should I feel sorry, says girl soldier who abused Iraqi prisoners at Abu Ghraib prison

Five years on: Lynndie England with her authorised biography We move on to another hideous image, in which the same group of prisoners - one of whom Graner had punched full in the face - were lined up and ordered to masturbate. How long had this sick charade continued? 'You are going to find this ridiculous,' says England, half suppressing a snigger. 'One guy did 45 minutes! Freddie just wanted to see if they would do it - and all seven of them lined up doing this.

from the Guardian

Torture accusations against UK troops in Iraq echo the scandal of Abu Ghraib

US soldiers at Abu Ghraib were shown to have part in acts of sexual depravity, other deliberate humiliations and illegal interrogations. In all, 17 soldiers and officers were suspended from duty in the wake of the scandal, and 11 were charged with maltreatment and other offences, court-martialled, sentenced to military prison, and dishonourably discharged. Two soldiers who appeared in the photos, Lynndie England and Charles Graner, were sentenced to three and 10 years respectively.

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from the Guardian

Interview: She's home from jail, but Lynndie England can't escape Abu Ghraib

'What happens in war happens' In 2004, photographs of abuses at Abu Ghraib shocked the world. Seven people were charged, but the face of the scandal will always be Lynndie England, the 21-year-old private grinning at the camera. Emma Brockes meets her

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TORTURED: Lynndie England, Abu Ghraib and the Photographs that Shocked the World. In addition to revealing the young Army Reservist's thoughts and feelings about her role in the abuse, the questionable conduct of the war and the Bush-era torture policies that contributed to the culture of abuse that came to exist at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. £33.60

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from Mail Online

Why the hell should I feel sorry, says girl soldier who abused Iraqi prisoners at Abu Ghraib prison

'Lynndie only has two moods: bored and p****d off.' They were taken on three separate nights in late October and early November 2003. At the time, her job was to process the detainees' admission and release forms. As a clerical support worker, she had no business in the so-called Hard Site at Abu Ghraib, a block of some 40 cells where the supposedly most dangerous inmates were held.

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A US soldier gives the "thumbs up" sign as she appears to be stiching up a prisoner's leg wound. It is unclear whether the injury was from a dog bite.

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