Pinterest • The world’s catalogue of ideas

Lucy Australopithecus Afarensis

Lucy (Australopithecus afarensis) - was named after listening to "Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds" by the Beatles when she was discovered by Donald Johanson and Tom Gray.

8
1

Australopithecus afarensis.

Today is the 41st anniversary of the find of Lucy (Australopithecus), in Ethiopia.

Lucy; Hadar, Ethiopia Age: About 3.2 million years old Species: Australopithecus afarensis

6
1

The famous skeleton Lucy has had a makeover, thanks to newly discovered fossils. A reconstruction of the 3.2-million-year-old hominin emerge...

2

Australopithecus afarensis is an extinct hominid that lived between 3.9 and 2.9 million years ago. The most famous fossil is the partial skeleton named Lucy (3.2 million years old) found by Donald Johanson and colleagues.

8

skeleton of Lucy (Australopithecus). It's 3.2 millions years old, found by Donald Johansen at Hadar in Ethopia

2

Australopithecus afarensis is an extinct hominid that lived between 3.9 and 2.9 million years ago. A. afarensis was slenderly built, like the younger Australopithecus africanus. It is thought that A. afarensis was more closely related to the genus Homo (which includes the modern human species Homo sapiens), whether as a direct ancestor or a close relative of an unknown ancestor, than any other known primate from the same time.[2] The most famous fossil is the partial skeleton named Lucy.

14
from National Geographic News

"Lucy's Baby" a Born Climber, Hinting Human Ancestors Lingered in Trees

"Lucy's Baby" a Born Climber, Hinting Human Ancestors Lingered in Trees Australopithecus afarensis' shoulders pointed upward, new fossil study suggests.

3

'Lucy' (Australopithecus afarensis) via Wikipedia.org -- Skeletal reconstruction of the 3.2 million year old, first hominid. Notice the near fully adducted hallux (big toe) of the left foot.

1