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Harriet Tubman marries John Tubman. In 1844 at the age of 25, she married John Tubman, a free African American who did not share her dream.Since she was a slave, she knew there could be a chance that she could be sold and her marriage would be split apart. Harriet dreamed of traveling north. There, she would be free and would not have to worry about having her marriage split up by the slave trade. She said she would go by herself. He told her that if she ran off, he would tell her master.

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Harriet Tubman. You gotta admit, she was a bad ass. She could've just escaped and stay safely in the north. But no, this chick right here went back and guided others to freedom. They should make a movie about this woman and not some cheapo BET crap, but a real movie. Someone make it happen.

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Harriet Tubman with slaves she helped rescue during the American Civil War, ca. 1885. Left to right: Harriet Tubman; Gertie Davis {Watson} (adopted daughter of Tubman} behind Tubman; Nelson Davis (husband and 8th USCT veteran); Lee Cheney (great-great-niece); “Pop” {John} Alexander; Walter Green; Blind “Aunty” Sarah Parker; Dora Stewart (great-niece and granddaughter of Tubman’s brother Robert Ross aka John Stewart).

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"Freedom Stairway" the one hundred steps leading down from the Rankin House toward the Ohio River. The John Rankin House in Ripley was a station on the Underground Railroad It was said that when a light shone in the window of Rankins home , it was safe for the slaves to approach. Rankin helped more than 2 thousand slaves to escape..Riply Ohio

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Harriet Tubman (born Araminta Ross; c. March 1822 – March 10, 1913) was an African-American abolitionist, humanitarian and Union spy during the American Civil War. After escaping from slavery, into which she was born, she made 13 missions to rescue more than 70 slaves using the network of antislavery activists and safe houses known as the Underground Railroad. She later helped John Brown recruit men for his raid on Harpers Ferry, and in the post-war era struggled for womens suffrage

In 1844 at the age of 25, she married John Tubman, a free African American who did not share her dream. Since she was a slave, she knew there could be a chance that she could be sold and her marriage would be split apart. Harriet dreamed of traveling north. There, she would be free and would not have to worry about having her marriage split up by the slave trade. But, John did not want her to go north. He said he was fine where he was and that there was no reason for moving north. She said…

Harriet Tubman's personal book of hymns. Gospel Hymns No, 2, by P.P. Bliss and Ira Sankey. Published Chicago; John Church (1876). Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture, Gift of Charles L. Blockson.