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Photographer Dorothea Lange documented the forced evacuation of Japanese (and other Asian) Americans to camps; eventually, around 120,000 people were detained for the duration of World War II. Of those, 62 percent were American citizens. (A far smaller number of Germans and Italians were affected by the order as well.)

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During World War II Japanese Americans experienced this sort of fear and hatred in a place they thought of as home.

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Yamato (大和?), named after the ancient Japanese Yamato Province, was the lead ship of the Yamato class of battleships that served with the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War II. On 7 April 1945 she was sunk by American carrier-based bombers and torpedo bombers with the loss of most of her crew.

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Not Just A 'Black Thing': An Asian-American's Bond With Malcolm X

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Roughly a hundred thousand Japanese-Americans ended up in camps. U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs Executive Order 9066 on February 19, uprooting Japanese Americans on the west coast to be sent to Internment camps. The order led to the internment of Japanese Americans or AJAs (Americans of Japanese Ancestry) in which some 120,000 ethnic Japanese people were held in internment camps for the duration of the war.

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A Japanese American unfurled this banner the day after the Pearl Harbor attack. This Dorothea Lange photograph was taken in March 1942, just prior to the man's internment.

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Group 3 Assignment 5 – WWII Japanese Internment Camps

japanese american internment camps | Photo: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_American_internment

Photo showing internment of ethnic Japanese in America following Presidential Executive Order 9066 (signed and issued by FDR in 1942). Around 120,000 ethnic Japanese were held in internment camps for the duration of the war. 62% were American born citizens. As part of the order 11,000 people of German ancestery were also interned including Jewish refugees.