THE BANSHEE is a female spirit in Irish mythology, usually seen as an omen of death and a messenger from the underworld. In legend, a banshee is a fairy woman who begins to wail if someone is about to die. In Scottish Gaelic mythology, she is known as the bean sìth or bean-nighe and is seen washing the bloodstained clothes or armour of those who are about to die.

THE BANSHEE is a female spirit in Irish mythology, usually seen as an omen of death and a messenger from the underworld. In legend, a banshee is a fairy woman who begins to wail if someone is about to die. In Scottish Gaelic mythology, she is known as the bean sìth or bean-nighe and is seen washing the bloodstained clothes or armour of those who are about to die.

In Irish and Scottish mythology, the Cailleach is a hag goddess concerned with creation, harvest, the weather and sovereignty. In partnership with the goddess Brigid, she is a seasonal goddess, seen as ruling the autumn and winter months while Brigid rules the spring and summer.  § Illustration: Cailleach by Mairin-Taj Caya

In Irish and Scottish mythology, the Cailleach is a hag goddess concerned with creation, harvest, the weather and sovereignty. In partnership with the goddess Brigid, she is a seasonal goddess, seen as ruling the autumn and winter months while Brigid rules the spring and summer. § Illustration: Cailleach by Mairin-Taj Caya

Diancecht was the Irish god of Healing and Medicine in Celtic culture during the Bronze age in Ireland. Diancecht was the son of Dagda, "the good god of the Irish Celts", and was the physician to the Tuatha De Danaan, the ruling clan of gods. His son, Miach, was also a healer but preferred to use incantations and herbs when healing which was at odds with his father's surgical methods.

Diancecht was the Irish god of Healing and Medicine in Celtic culture during the Bronze age in Ireland. Diancecht was the son of Dagda, "the good god of the Irish Celts", and was the physician to the Tuatha De Danaan, the ruling clan of gods. His son, Miach, was also a healer but preferred to use incantations and herbs when healing which was at odds with his father's surgical methods.

Irish Folklore | Celtic Mythology - Myth Encyclopedia - god, story, legend, names ...

Irish Folklore | Celtic Mythology - Myth Encyclopedia - god, story, legend, names ...

Airmid - Goddess of Healing. In Irish mythology, one of the Tuatha Dé Danann. With her father Dian Cecht and brother Miach, she healed those injured in the Second Battle of Magh Tuiredh. After her jealous father slew her brother, Miach, Airmed wept over her brother's grave. Watered by her tears, all the healing herbs of the world sprung from the earth over Miach's body.

Airmid - Goddess of Healing. In Irish mythology, one of the Tuatha Dé Danann. With her father Dian Cecht and brother Miach, she healed those injured in the Second Battle of Magh Tuiredh. After her jealous father slew her brother, Miach, Airmed wept over her brother's grave. Watered by her tears, all the healing herbs of the world sprung from the earth over Miach's body.

In Celtic mythology, Lugh or Lug was a god of the sun and light known for his handsome appearance and skills in arts and crafts. A patron of heroes, Lug appears in many Irish and Welsh legends. Lug was the son of Cian and the grandson of Balor, the king of the evil Formorians, a race of violent, supernatural beings who lived in darkness. Lug became king of the Tuatha Dé Danaan, married the mortal woman Dechtire, and had a son named Cuchulain, who became a great hero.

In Celtic mythology, Lugh or Lug was a god of the sun and light known for his handsome appearance and skills in arts and crafts. A patron of heroes, Lug appears in many Irish and Welsh legends. Lug was the son of Cian and the grandson of Balor, the king of the evil Formorians, a race of violent, supernatural beings who lived in darkness. Lug became king of the Tuatha Dé Danaan, married the mortal woman Dechtire, and had a son named Cuchulain, who became a great hero.

Immortal - Art Book of Myths and Legends. "Cu Sidhe" illustration by Mateusz Michalski. Writing and art direction by David Sanhueza. Pre-order now: www.game-o-gami.com/store

Immortal - Art Book of Myths and Legends. "Cu Sidhe" illustration by Mateusz Michalski. Writing and art direction by David Sanhueza. Pre-order now: www.game-o-gami.com/store

Irish Mythology | SciFi and Fantasy Art The Mythical Celtic Animals by Ingrid ´GrayWolf ...

Irish Mythology | SciFi and Fantasy Art The Mythical Celtic Animals by Ingrid ´GrayWolf ...

Balor  In the Celtic-Irish mythology, Balor is the god of death and the king of the Fomorians, a race of giants.  Balor had only one eye, which he kept closed because anything he looked at would die instantly.

Balor In the Celtic-Irish mythology, Balor is the god of death and the king of the Fomorians, a race of giants. Balor had only one eye, which he kept closed because anything he looked at would die instantly.

tir na nog | Tir na Nog is an island in ancient Irish mythology. Tir na Nog, in the ...

tir na nog | Tir na Nog is an island in ancient Irish mythology. Tir na Nog, in the ...

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