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Japanese destroyers (Fubuki class-II) before the start of military action against the allies in the Pacific in 1941. #8C

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IJN Fusō(金剛) porto di Kure , 1933 - Corazzata - Classe Fusō - Ordinata 1911 Impostata 1912 Entrata in servizio 1915 Destino finale Affondate entrambe nella Battaglia dello Stretto di Surigao, il 25 ottobre 1944 Caratteristiche generali Dislocamento 39.782 Lunghezza 213 m Larghezza 30,61 m Altezza 9,68 m Propulsione 4 eliche; turbine Brown-Curtis; 24 caldaie con 40000 shp prima dei lavori; 6 caldaie Kampon da 75.000 shp dopo i lavori[1] Velocità 25 nodi Autonomia 8.000 m a 14 n…

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軽巡洋艦 大淀 Light Cruiser Oyodo. Click this image to show the full-size version.

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Aircraft carrier "Kasagi",1945. Akagi (赤城?, "Red Castle") was an aircraft carrier of the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN), named after Mount Akagi in present-day Gunma Prefecture. Though she was laid down as an Amagi-class battlecruiser, Akagi was converted to an aircraft carrier while still under construction to comply with the terms of the Washington Naval Treaty.

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Ayanami Stern View. Imperial Japanese Navy destroyer Ayanami, the second Japanese warship to bear that name, in April 1930. Date 30 April 1930 Ayanami , "Twilled Waves") was the eleventh of twenty-four Fubuki-class destroyers, built for the Imperial Japanese Navy following World War I. When introduced into services, these ships were the most powerful destroyers in the world.[They served as first-line destroyers through the 1930s, and remained formidable weapons systems well into the Pacific

左から3人目が東郷平八郎、その右隣が上村彦之丞、右端が秋山真之。

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Artificially coloured, this relatively unknown picture gives a good impression of the scale of 71000 ton, 18 in Japanese super-battleship Yamato - together with her sister Musashi, the largest such vessels ever built by a significant margin. Musashi was sunk in October 1944 and Yamato in April 1945, both by sustained air attack.

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