For twenty-five years young readers have been moved by the telling of Sadako Sasaki's spirited battle with leukemia. She was two years old when the United States dropped an atom bomb on Hiroshima at the end of World War II; she began having dizzy spells when she was twelve. She faced the disease with an irrepressible spirit and focused her energy (and that of everyone who knew her) on folding 1,000 paper cranes, which Japanese legend tells would prompt the gods to make her well again…

For twenty-five years young readers have been moved by the telling of Sadako Sasaki's spirited battle with leukemia. She was two years old when the United States dropped an atom bomb on Hiroshima at the end of World War II; she began having dizzy spells when she was twelve. She faced the disease with an irrepressible spirit and focused her energy (and that of everyone who knew her) on folding 1,000 paper cranes, which Japanese legend tells would prompt the gods to make her well again…

A correspondent for TIME during World War II, John Hersey journeyed to Japan in May 1946 to report on the dropping of the first atomic bomb from the perspective of the residents of Hiroshima.

A correspondent for TIME during World War II, John Hersey journeyed to Japan in May 1946 to report on the dropping of the first atomic bomb from the perspective of the residents of Hiroshima.

Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes (chapter book):  Hiroshima-born Sadako is lively and athletic--the star of her school's running team. And then the dizzy spells start. Soon gravely ill with leukemia, the "atom bomb disease," Sadako faces her future with spirit and bravery. Recalling a Japanese legend, Sadako sets to work folding paper cranes. For the legend holds that if a sick person folds one thousand cranes, the gods will grant her wish and make her healthy again.

Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes (chapter book): Hiroshima-born Sadako is lively and athletic--the star of her school's running team. And then the dizzy spells start. Soon gravely ill with leukemia, the "atom bomb disease," Sadako faces her future with spirit and bravery. Recalling a Japanese legend, Sadako sets to work folding paper cranes. For the legend holds that if a sick person folds one thousand cranes, the gods will grant her wish and make her healthy again.

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The 30 Darkest Books From Your Childhood #refinery29  http://www.refinery29.com/2015/11/97104/scary-childrens-books#slide-13  Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes (1977)Author: Eleanor CoerrIllustrator: Ronald HimlerSummary: Sadako was a happy 2-year-old when the atom bomb fell on Hiroshima. Now, 10 years later, she’s dying of leukemia. According to a Japanese legend, though, if someone folds a thousand origami cranes, the person will be granted a wish. Sadako wo...

The 30 Darkest Books From Your Childhood #refinery29 http://www.refinery29.com/2015/11/97104/scary-childrens-books#slide-13 Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes (1977)Author: Eleanor CoerrIllustrator: Ronald HimlerSummary: Sadako was a happy 2-year-old when the atom bomb fell on Hiroshima. Now, 10 years later, she’s dying of leukemia. According to a Japanese legend, though, if someone folds a thousand origami cranes, the person will be granted a wish. Sadako wo...

Novel: When 12-year-old Sadako was two years old, she was living in the city of Hiroshima when the U.S.dropped an atomic bomb on the city. Without any apparent injuries, Sadako grew into an energetic girl who excelled at running until one day after a race she begins to feel dizzy. After she is diagnosed with leukaemia, a Japanese legend inspires her to begin folding 1000 paper cranes, which she believes will bring a miracle cure. Every day her brother hangs them up for her in the hospital…

Novel: When 12-year-old Sadako was two years old, she was living in the city of Hiroshima when the U.S.dropped an atomic bomb on the city. Without any apparent injuries, Sadako grew into an energetic girl who excelled at running until one day after a race she begins to feel dizzy. After she is diagnosed with leukaemia, a Japanese legend inspires her to begin folding 1000 paper cranes, which she believes will bring a miracle cure. Every day her brother hangs them up for her in the hospital…

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