The title of emperor was passed through successors. While teaching history we should familiarize ourselves with the political systems of Rome. We should appreciate the complexity and evolution of the systems that held Rome together for such a long time. More

The title of emperor was passed through successors. While teaching history we should familiarize ourselves with the political systems of Rome. We should appreciate the complexity and evolution of the systems that held Rome together for such a long time. More

Emperor Augustus as a nude hero. Bronze. 49—50 C.E. Naples, National Archaeological Museum

Emperor Augustus as a nude hero. Bronze. 49—50 C.E. Naples, National Archaeological Museum

~AUGUSTUS: The first Roman emperor, also called Octavian, adopted by Caesar and gained power by his defeat of Antony, he then became the emperor in effect~

~AUGUSTUS: The first Roman emperor, also called Octavian, adopted by Caesar and gained power by his defeat of Antony, he then became the emperor in effect~

(c. 25-24 BCE) Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa - a friend and son-in-law of Emperor Augustus, and his most illustrious general.

(c. 25-24 BCE) Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa - a friend and son-in-law of Emperor Augustus, and his most illustrious general.

It was one of the treasures selected for the British Museum’s A History of the World in 100 Objects as the fix-gazed, sole bronze portrait of the Roman emperor Augustus to survive with its original inlaid eyes.  But the Merӧe Head, which has just gone on show in a display telling the story of its violent fate in Egypt almost 2,000 years ago, was once the subject of crushing humiliation rather than hushed admiration from its public.

It was one of the treasures selected for the British Museum’s A History of the World in 100 Objects as the fix-gazed, sole bronze portrait of the Roman emperor Augustus to survive with its original inlaid eyes. But the Merӧe Head, which has just gone on show in a display telling the story of its violent fate in Egypt almost 2,000 years ago, was once the subject of crushing humiliation rather than hushed admiration from its public.

Basalt Head of Livia, Wife of Emperor Augustus, Circa 31 B.C. Giclée-Druck bei AllPosters.de

Basalt Head of Livia, Wife of Emperor Augustus, Circa 31 B.C

Basalt Head of Livia, Wife of Emperor Augustus, Circa 31 B.C. Giclée-Druck bei AllPosters.de

Maecenas Presenting the Liberal Arts to Emperor Augustus  By Giovanni Battista Tiepolo (1743)

Maecenas Presenting the Liberal Arts to Emperor Augustus By Giovanni Battista Tiepolo (1743)

Constantine I. R. 306-337. Constantine was the 1st Christian emperor. Constantine decided to establish a new Eastern capital representing the integration of the east into the Roman Empire as a whole. He settled on the Greek city of Byzantium, located in strategic spot. The residents spontaneously decided to rename the city Constantinople. Relics of the True Cross & the Rod of Moses protected the city. The Church of the Holy Apostles was built over a temple to Aphrodite. It was the “New…

Constantine I. R. 306-337. Constantine was the 1st Christian emperor. Constantine decided to establish a new Eastern capital representing the integration of the east into the Roman Empire as a whole. He settled on the Greek city of Byzantium, located in strategic spot. The residents spontaneously decided to rename the city Constantinople. Relics of the True Cross & the Rod of Moses protected the city. The Church of the Holy Apostles was built over a temple to Aphrodite. It was the “New…

This map depicts the deployment of Rome's legions when Rome's first emperor, Augustus, died in 14 AD. Augustus and his successors distributed the Roman army along the frontier, ensuring that no single general had command of more than a small fraction of Rome's troops at any one time. And emperors reduced the soldiers' dependence on their commanders by paying them salaries from the imperial treasury.

40 maps that explain the Roman Empire

This map depicts the deployment of Rome's legions when Rome's first emperor, Augustus, died in 14 AD. Augustus and his successors distributed the Roman army along the frontier, ensuring that no single general had command of more than a small fraction of Rome's troops at any one time. And emperors reduced the soldiers' dependence on their commanders by paying them salaries from the imperial treasury.

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