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from Mail Online

Picturing freedom: How former slaves used photography to imagine and create their new lives after Emancipation

Studio portrait of an African American sailor c. 1861 - 1865

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Door Of No Return, Slave Castle, Cape Coast, Ghana. Recently a DOOR OF RETURN has been added. This signifies the return of the slaves descendents to Ghana to acknowledge the history of their ancestors and each year Ghana celebrates Emancipation Day which welcomes the people from the Diaspora back to their homeland.

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Juneteenth, also known as Freedom Day or Emancipation Day, is a holiday in the United States honoring African American heritage by commemorating the announcement of the abolition of slavery in the U.S. State of Texas in 1865. Celebrated on June 19, the term is a combination of June and nineteenth (recognized as a state holiday or state holiday observance in 41 states of the United States). Texas enslaved persons got the word two years late.

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from The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross

What Is Juneteenth? African American History Blog

Juneteenth, also known as Freedom Day or Emancipation Day, commemorates the day the news of slavery's abolition reached Texas: June 19, 1865. Union General Gordon Granger made the announcement in Galveston one day after he and 2,000 federal troops arrived to occupy Texas and enforce emancipation, which had become federal law 2 1/2 years earlier.

James Longstreet (January 1821 – January 1904) was one of the foremost Confederate generals of the American Civil War and the principal subordinate to General Robert E. Lee, who called him his "Old War Horse." He served under Lee as a corps commander for many of the famous battles fought by the Army of Northern Virginia in the Eastern Theater, but also with Gen. Braxton Bragg in the Army of Tennessee in the Western Theater.

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from Mail Online

Picturing freedom: How former slaves used photography to imagine and create their new lives after Emancipation

African American woman holding a white child in 1855 - Envisioning Emancipation - Black Americans at the End of Slavery

5 disturbing historical practices you should never, ever try

Emancipation Day celebrates the signing of the Compensated Emancipation Act by President Abraham Lincoln on April 16, 1862.