Make your bike electric with this swap-in tire Electric bikes have been around for decades but haven't broken out of their niche audience. Instead of building a bicycle around electric power, GeoOrbital is a universal wheel you can swap into your existing bike to power your ride. GeoOrbital's creators had previously worked at SpaceX and Ford, companies that know a thing or two about renovating traditional transportation. The device replaces the front wheel in bikes with 26..

Make your bike electric with this swap-in tire Electric bikes have been around for decades but haven't broken out of their niche audience. Instead of building a bicycle around electric power, GeoOrbital is a universal wheel you can swap into your existing bike to power your ride. GeoOrbital's creators had previously worked at SpaceX and Ford, companies that know a thing or two about renovating traditional transportation. The device replaces the front wheel in bikes with 26..

Miners strike = not enough coal for the electricity power stations = 3 day working week to save the power = reduced income. Those long dark evenings playing cards by candlelight. Taking the dinner to cook in the neighbours gas oven. Then, the bin men went on strike, then the gravediggers. . . .

Miners strike = not enough coal for the electricity power stations = 3 day working week to save the power = reduced income. Those long dark evenings playing cards by candlelight. Taking the dinner to cook in the neighbours gas oven. Then, the bin men went on strike, then the gravediggers. . . .

The world's first Active House stands at the crest of an estate. Its south-facing roof is covered in solar panels and solar cells, which between them harness more than enough power to keep the occupants warm and the appliances running. In around 30 years' time, if designers have got their sums right, the excess electricity flowing from the house into Denmark's grid will have cancelled out the energy costs of building it, leaving a non-existent footprint on the earth's resources.

The world's first Active House stands at the crest of an estate. Its south-facing roof is covered in solar panels and solar cells, which between them harness more than enough power to keep the occupants warm and the appliances running. In around 30 years' time, if designers have got their sums right, the excess electricity flowing from the house into Denmark's grid will have cancelled out the energy costs of building it, leaving a non-existent footprint on the earth's resources.

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