Edmonia Lewis (1843-1911) was born in upstate New York in 1843 to a Chippewa Indian mother and African American father. Edmonia surpassed exorbitant odds to become the first African American, and Native American, female sculptor -- and was the first such artist to celebrate her racial identity.

Edmonia Lewis (1843-1911) was born in upstate New York in 1843 to a Chippewa Indian mother and African American father. Edmonia surpassed exorbitant odds to become the first African American, and Native American, female sculptor -- and was the first such artist to celebrate her racial identity.

Rising Above Prejudice – Sculptor Edmonia Lewis – By Pat Knepley The Old Schoolhouse Magazine - January 2014 - Page 124

Rising Above Prejudice – Sculptor Edmonia Lewis – By Pat Knepley The Old Schoolhouse Magazine - January 2014 - Page 124

Edmonia Lewis -artist Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia  Mary Edmonia Lewis (ca. July 4, 1844–September 17, 1907) was an African/Native American sculptor (African, Ojibwe and Haitian) who worked for most of her career in Rome. Her heritage is African-American and Native American and she gained fame and recognition as a sculptor in the international fine arts world.

Edmonia Lewis -artist Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Mary Edmonia Lewis (ca. July 4, 1844–September 17, 1907) was an African/Native American sculptor (African, Ojibwe and Haitian) who worked for most of her career in Rome. Her heritage is African-American and Native American and she gained fame and recognition as a sculptor in the international fine arts world.

Mary Edmonia Lewis (ca. July 4, 1844–September 17, 1907) was the first African American and Native American woman to gain fame and recognition as a sculptor in the international fine arts world. She was of African American, Haitian and Ojibwe descent. This sculpture of white marble is "Death of Cleopatra.". It is in the Smithsonian.

The Life and Death of Edmonia Lewis, Spinster and Sculptor

Mary Edmonia Lewis (ca. July 4, 1844–September 17, 1907) was the first African American and Native American woman to gain fame and recognition as a sculptor in the international fine arts world. She was of African American, Haitian and Ojibwe descent. This sculpture of white marble is "Death of Cleopatra.". It is in the Smithsonian.

The first professional African-American and Native-American sculptor, Edmonia Lewis earned critical praise for work that explored religious and classical themes.

The first professional African-American and Native-American sculptor, Edmonia Lewis earned critical praise for work that explored religious and classical themes.

Mary Edmonia Lewis (ca. July 4, 1844–September 17, 1907) was the first African American and Native American woman to gain fame and recognition as a sculptor in the international fine arts world. She was of African American, Haitian and Ojibwe descent. Minnehaha, marble, 1868, collection of the Newark Museum

Mary Edmonia Lewis (ca. July 4, 1844–September 17, 1907) was the first African American and Native American woman to gain fame and recognition as a sculptor in the international fine arts world. She was of African American, Haitian and Ojibwe descent. Minnehaha, marble, 1868, collection of the Newark Museum

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