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The wooden spools that you see hanging in the streets of Spitalfields indicate houses where Huguenots once resided. These symbols were put there in 1985, commemorating the tercentenary of the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes which brought the Huguenots to London and introduced the word ‘refugee’ to the English language.

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This day in 1598 - King Henry IV of France signed the Edict of Nantes which granted political rights to French Protestant Huguenots.

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An 18th century French ivory caricature relief portrait bust, of a man wearing a hood and a fleur de lis on his cloak 18th century carved giltwood frame. This bust is very similar to a set of seventeen sold by Sotheby's, London, Wednesday 16th December 1998, Lot 99, where they were attributed to Huguenots carvers in reply to their persecution after the revocation of the edict of Nantes in 1685. The portrait reliefs are of the leading figures working in France for the see link

A George III oak 8 day longcase clock Peter Amyot, Norwich (1733-1799) Peter Amyot (1733 - 1799) was of French Huguenot descent. The first immigrant from his family, Thomas, came to England at the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685 and settled in the parish of St Peter Mancroft in Norwich. Peter was a distinguished clock and watch maker, working first at White Lion Lane then at 19 Haymarket, and, newly in partnership with his apprentice James Bennett (1760 - 1845)

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Spice box

Spice box Unusually, this spice box was made in Rome. However, it is very similar to those made in Paris and London by Huguenot goldsmiths. It was perhaps made in Rome for a visiting English or French patron. When the Catholic King Louis XIV revoked the religiously tolerant Edict of Nantes in 1685, Huguenots (French Protestants) were forced to leave the country.

Stoneware delft tile. Huguenots of Spitalfields memorial plaque. 1598, the date of the Edict of Nantes - legislation under KIng Henri IV that granted substantial civil rights to the Calvinist protestants or Huguenots of France. Later revoked. Wan-Li style border motifs.

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Charles Marbury; Charles Marbury

This ivory medallion in relief, representing Charles Marbury (dates unknown), was made . 1700-1720 in Britain. David Le Marchand (1674-1726) was famed for his ivory carvings, particularly his portraits. He was a native of Dieppe, France, and came from a Huguenot, or Protestant, family. With the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685, and the consequent persecution of non-Catholics, he had to flee France

Month Duration Walnut Longcase Clock by Charles Cabrier of London Charles Cabrier II, son of Charles I and father of Charles III, was the most prominent clockmaker of the three namesakes. The Cabriers were a celebrated dynasty of Huguenot clockmakers who settled in London after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes (1685). A relatively large number of their clocks - built over a period of half a century - have survived

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Spice box

Spice box Huguenot Design When the Catholic King Louis XIV revoked the religiously tolerant Edict of Nantes in 1685, Huguenots (French Protestants) were forced to leave the country. Many were craftsmen who settled in London. Their technical skills and fashionable French style ensured the luxury silver, furniture, watches and jewellery they made were highly sought after. Huguenot specialists transformed English silver by introducing higher standards of craftsmanship

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Simon de Charmes was a successful French Huguenot clockmaker and pocket watch…

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