Pinterest • The world’s catalogue of ideas
from Boston.com

National Geographic Traveler Magazine: 2013 Photo Contest

INDIA | Freiwilligenarbeit im Ausland | Praktika im Ausland | Sprachkurse | Roadtrips uvm. | Volunteer Work | Internships | Language Courses | www.academical-travels.de

9
1

Tamil (தமிழ்), a Dravidian language spoken by around 52 million people in Indian, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Vietnam, Singapore, Canada, the USA, UK and Australia. It is the first language of the Indian state of Tamil Nadu, and is spoken by a significant minority of people (2 million) in north-eastern Sri Lanka. (...)

11
2

The name 'Bhil' is derived from the word villu or billu, which according to the Dravidian language is known as Bow. The name Bhil is also finds mentioned in the great epic called Mahabharata and Ramayana. The Bhil women offered ber to Lord Rama, when he was wandering through the jungles of Dhandaka, searching Sita.

2

Dravidian subgroup of languages spoken in India and other regions of South Asia. The red denotes southern languages (i.e. Malayalam, Tamil, Kannada), the orange denotes the south-central region (i.e. Telegu), the yellow the central region, and the green the northern regions of South Asia. Dravidian languages are a language family spoken mainly in southern India, parts of eastern and central India, northeastern Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, and overseas in Malaysia & Singapore.

1

The seals were used as signatures, stamped onto bales of merchandise to identify the owners or issuing authority. Most scholars believe that the symbols derive from an early Dravidian language, from the same family as Tamil and other languages of southern India. The keenly observed animals pictured on the seals offer the most impressive surviving examples of the Indus people’s artistic skills. The most common motif is a one horned antelope.

2
1

Naga Man - Despite representing the oldest known layer of population in India, predating the Dravidian and Indo-Aryan peoples that dominate the area today, the linguistic relatives of the Munda in the large Austroasiatic language family are to be found in remote mountainous regions scattered across southeast Asia (Thailand, Malaysia, Laos, southern China, in addition to the far eastern Indian regions of Meghalaya and the Nicobar Islands)

22
6