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The moon passed between Nasa's Deep Space Climate Observatory and the Earth, allowing the satellite to capture this rare image of the moon's far side in full sunlight. We normally don't see this side of the moon. As the moon is tidally locked to the earth and doesn't rotate, we only ever see the one face from the earth. Awesome shot!

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from Fox News

SpaceX launches observatory on 3rd try, nixes landing test

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NASA captures the Moon crossing the face of the Earth, for the second time (taken by the DSCOVR satellite's EPIC camera system from LaGrange point 1).

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from Global News

SpaceX launches deep-space observatory on 3rd try, nixes ocean landing - National

SpaceX launches deep-space observatory on 3rd try, nixes ocean landing - National | Globalnews.ca

A NASA camera aboard the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite captured a unique view of the moon as it moved in front of the sunlit side of Earth last month. The series of test images shows the fully illuminated “dark side” of the moon that is never visible from Earth.

from ScienceDaily

From a million miles away, NASA camera shows moon crossing face of Earth

A NASA camera aboard the Deep Space Climate Observatory satellite captured a unique view of the moon as it moved in front of the sunlit side of Earth last month. The series of test images shows the fully illuminated 'dark side' of the moon that is never visible from Earth.

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from NASA

Satellite Camera Provides “EPIC” View of Earth

Earth as seen on July 6, 2015 from a distance of one million miles by a NASA scientific camera

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from NASA

Captures "EPIC" Earth Image

Taken from NASA's DSCOVR Deep Space Climate Observatory satellite with the first camera permanently stationed to capture the entire Earth in a single shot.

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The Deep Space Climate Observatory is pictured inside the Astrotech satellite processing facility in Titusville, Florida. One half of the Falcon 9 rocket's payload fairing is seen behind the spacecraft. Credit: NOAA