The J. Craig Venter Institute's Summer Internship program is a paid 8-week program for students interested in genomics. Under the supervision of a mentor, students conduct research in genomic medicine, infectious diseases, plat, microbial and environmental genomics, synthetic biology and biological energy, bioinformatics, and software engineering. Students must be 16 years old to apply, have a B average and demonstrate a strong interest in te chosen subject.

The J. Craig Venter Institute's Summer Internship program is a paid 8-week program for students interested in genomics. Under the supervision of a mentor, students conduct research in genomic medicine, infectious diseases, plat, microbial and environmental genomics, synthetic biology and biological energy, bioinformatics, and software engineering. Students must be 16 years old to apply, have a B average and demonstrate a strong interest in te chosen subject.

(May 20, 2010) — Researchers at the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI), published results today describing the successful construction of the first self-replicating, synthetic bacterial cell.   The team synthesized the 1.08 million base pair chromosome of a modified genome.   This is the proof that genomes can be designed in the computer, chemically made in the laboratory and transplanted into a recipient cell to produce a new self-replicating cell controlled only by the synthetic genome.

(May 20, 2010) — Researchers at the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI), published results today describing the successful construction of the first self-replicating, synthetic bacterial cell. The team synthesized the 1.08 million base pair chromosome of a modified genome. This is the proof that genomes can be designed in the computer, chemically made in the laboratory and transplanted into a recipient cell to produce a new self-replicating cell controlled only by the synthetic genome.

Craig Venter’s Bugs Might Save the World - NYTimes.com

Craig Venter’s Bugs Might Save the World

Craig Venter’s Bugs Might Save the World - NYTimes.com

Craig Venter’s Bugs Might Save the World - NYTimes.com One smart guy living a great life.

Craig Venter’s Bugs Might Save the World

Craig Venter’s Bugs Might Save the World - NYTimes.com One smart guy living a great life.

Craig Venter: 'This isn't a fantasy look at the future. We are doing the future'

Craig Venter: 'This isn't a fantasy look at the future. We are doing the future'

Craig Venter at Synthetic Genomics, his laboratory in La Jolla, California. Photograph: Mark Mahaney/Redux /Eyevine

*Shatter Viruses With Sound Vibration* Scientists may one day be able to destroy viruses in the same way that opera singers presumably shatter wine glasses. New research mathematically determined the frequencies at which simple viruses could be shaken to death. "The capsid of a virus is something like the shell of a turtle," said physicist Otto Sankey of Arizona State University. "If the shell can be compromised [by mechanical vibrations], the virus can be inactivated."

New Way to Kill Viruses: Shake Them to Death

*Shatter Viruses With Sound Vibration* Scientists may one day be able to destroy viruses in the same way that opera singers presumably shatter wine glasses. New research mathematically determined the frequencies at which simple viruses could be shaken to death. "The capsid of a virus is something like the shell of a turtle," said physicist Otto Sankey of Arizona State University. "If the shell can be compromised [by mechanical vibrations], the virus can be inactivated."

Craig Venter: On the verge of creating synthetic life  "Can we create new life out of our digital universe?" Craig Venter asks. His answer is "yes" -- and pretty soon. He walks through his latest research and promises that we'll soon be able to build and boot up a synthetic chromosome.

Craig Venter: On the verge of creating synthetic life "Can we create new life out of our digital universe?" Craig Venter asks. His answer is "yes" -- and pretty soon. He walks through his latest research and promises that we'll soon be able to build and boot up a synthetic chromosome.

Craig Venter - Synthetic Life, TED X NASA - sequenced DNA virus of 5000 base pairs (genome) - injected into e. coli, recognized synthetic DNA as real - software (genetic code) building its own hardware (viral particle) - a living, self-replicating cell.

Craig Venter - Synthetic Life, TED X NASA - sequenced DNA virus of 5000 base pairs (genome) - injected into e. coli, recognized synthetic DNA as real - software (genetic code) building its own hardware (viral particle) - a living, self-replicating cell.

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