A little different to our traditional hen dos, the bridal shower is a relatively new arrival to the UK from across the pond. If you want to enjoy a relaxed time with your family and friends and allow everyone to meet before the wedding, this is the ideal opportunity. Usually hosted from home, a bridal shower is a little more low-key than a lively British hen do.  You can have just as much fun planning and putting your own spin on it, though - here are our top ideas to help you get…

10 Beautiful Bridal Shower Ideas You'll Want To Steal

A little different to our traditional hen dos, the bridal shower is a relatively new arrival to the UK from across the pond. If you want to enjoy a relaxed time with your family and friends and allow everyone to meet before the wedding, this is the ideal opportunity. Usually hosted from home, a bridal shower is a little more low-key than a lively British hen do. You can have just as much fun planning and putting your own spin on it, though - here are our top ideas to help you get…

Raspberry and coconut cake

Raspberry and coconut cake

Love you long time. Laksa, tom kha soup and the piña colada are just a few of my favourite coconutty things, and now the coconut is having its moment in fashion I get to scoff it in all manner of stuff from snack bars to juices, which pleases me no end.

Montacute House, Somerset / 24 Breathtaking British Wedding Venues

24 Breathtaking British Wedding Venues

Liz and Jamie’s DIY Festival Wedding, with Tipi’s, a Silent Disco and Lots of fun. By Lifeline Photography

DIY Festival Wedding at Rutland Water By Lifeline Photography

Liz and Jamie’s DIY Festival Wedding, with Tipi’s, a Silent Disco and Lots of fun. By Lifeline Photography

A "scramble" in Gemmel Street, Bridgeton, 1955. Scrambles were a tradition at weddings in many parts of Scotland, when neighbours turned out to see the bridal party leave the street on its way to the church. Coins were thrown from the wedding car (usually by the father of the bride) as it drove off and children scrambled to pick up as many as they could.

A "scramble" in Gemmel Street, Bridgeton, 1955. Scrambles were a tradition at weddings in many parts of Scotland, when neighbours turned out to see the bridal party leave the street on its way to the church. Coins were thrown from the wedding car (usually by the father of the bride) as it drove off and children scrambled to pick up as many as they could.

Pinterest
Search