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What Would Happen If You Fell into a Black Hole?

Falling into a black hole would be a rough ride, but there would be some major upshots.

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In August of 2007, astronomers located a gigantic hole in the universe. This empty space, stretching nearly a billion light-years across, is devoid of any matter such as galaxies, stars, and gas, and neither does it contain the strange and mysterious dark matter, which can be detected but not seen. The large void in the Constellation Eridanus appears to be improbable given current cosmological models. A radical and controversial theory proposes that it is a "universe-in-mass black hole"

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STEPHEN HAWKING: How to build a time machine

Time travel through a wormhole STEPHEN HAWKING: How to build a time machine Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/moslive/article-1269288/STEPHEN-HAWKING-How-build-time-machine.html#ixzz2hC8SepaW Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

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Parallel universes - Black Hole connected to a theoretical White Hole. - If the theoretical science is correct, there are an infinite number of universes with same situations and different outcomes, do you believe?

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Monster black hole is the largest and brightest ever found

An artist's illustration of the black hole at the heart of a quasar in the distant universe. The biggest black hole known to exist lives in the nearby galaxy M87. It's 2,000 times bigger than the Milky Way's supermassive black hole.

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Black holes are strange regions where gravity is strong enough to bend light, warp space and distort time.<br />

Paradox Solved? How Information Can Escape from a Black Hole

Black holes are strange regions where gravity is strong enough to bend light, warp space and distort time.<br />

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What Sonic Black Holes Say About Real Ones: Can a fluid analogue of a black hole point physicists toward the theory of quantum gravity, or is it a red herring? ...

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This genius map explains how everything in physics is connected - ScienceAlert