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Amelia Mary Earhart (/ˈɛərhɑrt/ air-hart; July 24, 1897 – disappeared 1937) was an American aviation pioneer and author. She was the first aviatrix to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean.She set many other records, wrote best-selling books about her flying experiences and was instrumental in the formation of The Ninety-Nines, an organization for female pilots. During a circumnavigational flight of the globe in 1937 Earhart disappeared over the central Pacific Ocean near Howland Island.

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Amelia Earhart. In 1932 Earhart—with her leather jacket, scarf and close-cropped hair—became the first female aviator to fly a solo transatlantic flight, redefining expectations of women along the way. Though the 39-year-old disappeared in 1937 during a flight around the world, she still serves as a reminder of female fearlessness. - Amy Spencer, Glamour Magazine 2009

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from the Guardian

Has Amelia Earhart's plane finally been found? Not so fast

Amelia Earhart "A single act of kindness throws out roots in all directions, and…

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Amelia Mary Earhart (1897-1937) was the first woman to receive the U.S. Distinguished Flying Cross, awarded for becoming the first aviatrix to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean.

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from Express.co.uk

Mystery solved? American teacher claims to have 'the key' to Amelia Earhart disappearance

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from io9

Is this the debris field from Amelia Earhart's plane?

Amelia Earhart; July 24, 1897 – disappeared 1937) was a noted American aviation pioneer and author. Earhart was the first aviatrix to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean. She wrote best-selling books about her flying experiences (from Wikipedia). Image: http://www.enlomio.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/Amelia-Earhart.jpg

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from Good Housekeeping

125 Most Influential Women

Amelia EarhartThe first woman to fly across the Atlantic tragically disappeared in 1937 on what was meant to be a globe-circling flight. She accomplished a larger mission, dramatically expanding the world's notions of how high a woman can soar.

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