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Fastest 100m with a can balanced on head - Dog - Speed - Explore Records - Guinness World Records

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10 people you didn't know had epilepsy

Florence Delorez Griffith Joyner, also known as Flo-Jo, was an American track and field athlete. She is still considered the fastest woman of all time - the world records she set in 1988 for both the 100 m and 200 m have yet to be seriously challenged. Star of the 1988 Olympics Florence Griffith-Joyner developed epilepsy in her 30s and died in her sleep as the result of an epileptic seizure in 1998 at the age of 38.

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Florence Griffith "Flo-Jo" Joyner - American track and field athlete. She is considered the fastest woman of all time based on the fact that the world records she set in 1988 for both the 100 m and 200 m still stand and have yet to be seriously challenged. She died in her sleep as the result of an epileptic seizure in 1998 at the age of 38.

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After winning the 100 meters in the Los Angeles Olympics, Evelyn Ashford (right) hugs teammate Jeanette Bolden. August 6, 1984. In addition to the 100 m, Evelyn won the 4 x 100 m relay in 1984. She returned to the Olympics in 1988 and 1992, winning two gold medals in the 4 x 100 m relay and a silver medal in the 100 m. Jeanette only won one gold medal, her career ended when she ruptured her Achilles tendon at the 1988 Olympic trials. Today she is a track and field coach at UCLA.

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Video: Awesome quadcopter drone ascends 100 m into the sky in just 3.871 seconds

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How far has the world record for the men's 100 meter dash fallen in the last 100 years?

What Is a Decent Swim Time for 100M?

Swimming a two-minute 100 m could be the best of times or the worst of times. You might start out as a beginning adult swimmer, just grateful to complete the distance without stopping. With improved technique and endurance, your swim times improve, along with your dissatisfaction for your previous performance. As of 2011, the Olympic record for the...

longest-motorcycle-full A huge mass of onlookers gathered round to watch eccentric inventor Bharat Sinh Parmar (India) ride and pose on his super-stretched motorcycle. To attain his record Bharat had to successfully ride the bike for a minimum distance of 100 m (328 ft) continuously and unassisted – a tricky challenge for such a long, two-wheeled vehicle.