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British Museum - Season Ticket for Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens, 1750; Silver ticket for entry to a pleasure garden.

British Museum - Season Ticket for Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens, 1750; Silver ticket for entry to a pleasure garden.

Gaming Houses of the West End Regency readers are well aware of the popularity of gaming in London among gentlemen. Article via RegencyReader.com

Gaming Houses of the West End Regency readers are well aware of the popularity of gaming in London among gentlemen. Article via RegencyReader.com

Vauxhall Gardens: Three Piazzas of Supper-Boxes, via Susana Ellis

Vauxhall Gardens: Three Piazzas of Supper-Boxes

"The Rotunda at Ranelagh" by Thomas Bowles, 1754. Ranelagh Gardens opened in 1742. It was considered more fashionable than the older Vauxhall. Pitt's sister Harriot frequently mentions going there in her letters, and Pitt would sometimes join her.

In the footsteps of the fashionable world

"The Rotunda at Ranelagh" by Thomas Bowles, 1754. Ranelagh Gardens opened in 1742. It was considered more fashionable than the older Vauxhall. Pitt's sister Harriot frequently mentions going there in her letters, and Pitt would sometimes join her.

Hatchards of London in Piccadilly. This bookshop has been here since 1797 and is the oldest bookshop in London.

Hatchards of London in Piccadilly. This bookshop has been here since 1797 and is the oldest bookshop in London.

Black and white view of 19th Century Picadilly St. In 1797 John Hatchard (1769-1849) opened a bookshop at No. 173 Piccadilly. In 1801 he moved premises to No. 190. Later the store was moved to No. 187 where it has remained. In Hatchard's time the shop was as much a social meeting place for the literary-minded as it was a bookshop. Residents of Albany, just across Piccadilly, including Byron frequented the shop. The daily newspapers were always laid out on the table by the fireplace

Black and white view of 19th Century Picadilly St. In 1797 John Hatchard (1769-1849) opened a bookshop at No. 173 Piccadilly. In 1801 he moved premises to No. 190. Later the store was moved to No. 187 where it has remained. In Hatchard's time the shop was as much a social meeting place for the literary-minded as it was a bookshop. Residents of Albany, just across Piccadilly, including Byron frequented the shop. The daily newspapers were always laid out on the table by the fireplace

Vauxhall Gardens: The Orchestra and the Supper-Boxes, via Susana Ellis

Vauxhall Gardens: The Orchestra and the Supper-Boxes