Kalpesh Parmar
More ideas from Kalpesh
This seems unintuitive and rather limiting. Lots of other developers have been frustrated by this too, and have discovered a solution: call the Pinterest bookmarklet.js code from your website, which seems to work great.But when the JavaScript code was thoroughly examined, the inefficiency of this method became very evident. The bookmarklet code is structured as a self-executing anonymous JavaScript function, which simply means that it runs immediately after you load the file—and in fact…

This seems unintuitive and rather limiting. Lots of other developers have been frustrated by this too, and have discovered a solution: call the Pinterest bookmarklet.js code from your website, which seems to work great.But when the JavaScript code was thoroughly examined, the inefficiency of this method became very evident. The bookmarklet code is structured as a self-executing anonymous JavaScript function, which simply means that it runs immediately after you load the file—and in fact…

This seems unintuitive and rather limiting. Lots of other developers have been frustrated by this too, and have discovered a solution: call the Pinterest bookmarklet.js code from your website, which seems to work great.But when the JavaScript code was thoroughly examined, the inefficiency of this method became very evident. The bookmarklet code is structured as a self-executing anonymous JavaScript function, which simply means that it runs immediately after you load the file—and in fact…

This seems unintuitive and rather limiting. Lots of other developers have been frustrated by this too, and have discovered a solution: call the Pinterest bookmarklet.js code from your website, which seems to work great.But when the JavaScript code was thoroughly examined, the inefficiency of this method became very evident. The bookmarklet code is structured as a self-executing anonymous JavaScript function, which simply means that it runs immediately after you load the file—and in fact…