Opium Wars

The Museum of Drugs is dedicated to exploring the history of societal relationship with substance use, from tolerance through to criminalisation. Website: www.museumofdrugs.com Twitter: @museumofdrugs.com Facebook: The Museum of Drugs Paraphernalia and Related Antiquities Instagram: museumofdrugs
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I like to use Chinese opium pipes because I know they will work. The Chinese have the most effective and modern way of using opium. The only thing I change on the pipe is that I embellish them with small paint work and different colorful stones. It quite expensive to fix them this way, but I believe my customers should only have the best.

I like to use Chinese opium pipes because I know they will work. The Chinese have the most effective and modern way of using opium. The only thing I change on the pipe is that I embellish them with small paint work and different colorful stones. It quite expensive to fix them this way, but I believe my customers should only have the best.

Empress Wan Jung (1906-1946), also known as Empress Wan Rong, Empress Xiao Ke Min and Empress Elizabeth, was the last Empress of China.

Empress Wan Jung (1906-1946), also known as Empress Wan Rong, Empress Xiao Ke Min and Empress Elizabeth, was the last Empress of China.

Portrait of Dr. William Jardine by George Chinnery (1774-1852). William Jardine (1784 – 1843) was a Scottish physician and merchant who co-founded the Hong Kong conglomerate Jardine, Matheson and Company.

Portrait of Dr. William Jardine by George Chinnery (1774-1852). William Jardine (1784 – 1843) was a Scottish physician and merchant who co-founded the Hong Kong conglomerate Jardine, Matheson and Company.

In the first Opium War the Chinese were defeated on sea and land and sued for peace. The settlement after the first war awarded Hong Kong to the British and opened other ports to European trade and residence. By the 1890s, ninety ports were open and foreigners had gained long-term leases over ports and surrounding territory. Opium continued to pour into China. British officials managed China’s foreign trade and customs, and the court had to accept European ambassadors.

In the first Opium War the Chinese were defeated on sea and land and sued for peace. The settlement after the first war awarded Hong Kong to the British and opened other ports to European trade and residence. By the 1890s, ninety ports were open and foreigners had gained long-term leases over ports and surrounding territory. Opium continued to pour into China. British officials managed China’s foreign trade and customs, and the court had to accept European ambassadors.

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